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Master Arduino Programming in 24 Hours with Sams Teach Yourself: From Basics to Advanced Projects


Arduino Programming in 24 Hours, Sams Teach Yourself book pdf




If you are looking for a comprehensive and practical guide to learn Arduino programming from scratch, you might want to check out Arduino Programming in 24 Hours, Sams Teach Yourself by Richard Blum. This book is designed to teach you C programming on Arduino in 24 easy-to-follow lessons that cover everything from setting up your programming environment to creating advanced projects using networking and prototyping tools. In this article, we will give you an overview of what this book offers, why you should learn Arduino programming, and how you can get started with your own Arduino projects.




Arduino Programming in 24 Hours, Sams Teach Yourself book pdf


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What is Arduino and why learn it?




Arduino is an open-source platform that consists of a microcontroller board and a software development environment that allows you to create interactive electronic devices. You can use Arduino to control sensors, motors, LEDs, displays, speakers, cameras, and many other components using simple C code. Arduino is widely used by hobbyists, makers, artists, educators, students, and professionals for various purposes such as robotics, home automation, gaming, art installations, musical instruments, wearable devices, and more.


Learning Arduino programming can be fun and rewarding for several reasons. First of all, you can unleash your creativity and imagination by building your own custom devices that can interact with the physical world. Second, you can learn the fundamentals of electronics and programming that can help you understand how modern technology works. Third, you can join a vibrant community of Arduino enthusiasts who share their ideas, projects, resources, and support online. Fourth, you can apply your Arduino skills to other domains such as IoT (Internet of Things), AI (Artificial Intelligence), VR (Virtual Reality), etc.


How to set up your Arduino programming environment




To start programming your Arduino board, you need two things: the Arduino IDE (Integrated Development Environment) and a USB cable. The Arduino IDE is a free software that allows you to write, compile, upload, and run your code on your board. You can download it from https://www.arduino.cc/en/software. The USB cable is used to connect your board to your computer and transfer data between them.


The steps to set up your Arduino programming environment are as follows:


  • Download and install the Arduino IDE on your computer.



  • Plug your Arduino board into your computer using the USB cable.



  • Launch the Arduino IDE and select your board and port from the Tools menu.



  • Open an example sketch from the File menu and click the Upload button to upload it to your board.



  • Open the Serial Monitor from the Tools menu and observe the output of your sketch.



Congratulations, you have successfully set up your Arduino programming environment and run your first sketch!


The basics of Arduino programming




Arduino programming is based on C, which is a popular and powerful programming language that is widely used in embedded systems. C is a low-level language that gives you direct access to the hardware and memory of your device. However, C can also be challenging to learn and use, especially for beginners. That's why Arduino provides a simplified version of C that hides some of the complexity and adds some features that make it easier and more intuitive to program your board.


Some of the basic concepts of Arduino programming are:


  • Data types: These are the categories of data that you can use in your program, such as int (integer), float (decimal number), char (character), bool (boolean), etc.



  • Variables: These are the names that you assign to data values that you want to store and manipulate in your program, such as ledPin, buttonState, temperature, etc.



  • Operators: These are the symbols that you use to perform calculations and comparisons on data values, such as + (addition), - (subtraction), * (multiplication), / (division), == (equal to), != (not equal to), etc.



  • Control structures: These are the blocks of code that control the flow of your program, such as if (conditional statement), for (loop statement), switch (multiple choice statement), etc.



  • Functions: These are the reusable pieces of code that perform a specific task, such as setup (initialization function), loop (main function), digitalWrite (output function), analogRead (input function), etc.



To write an Arduino program, you need to follow this basic structure:


// This is a comment // Comments are used to explain your code // Define global variables and constants here int ledPin = 13; // This variable stores the pin number of the LED // The setup function runs once when the board is powered on or reset void setup() // Initialize pins and serial communication here pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT); // This function sets the LED pin as an output Serial.begin(9600); // This function starts serial communication at 9600 baud rate // The loop function runs repeatedly after the setup function void loop() // Write your main logic here digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH); // This function turns on the LED Serial.println("LED is on"); // This function prints a message to the serial monitor delay(1000); // This function pauses the program for 1000 milliseconds digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW); // This function turns off the LED Serial.println("LED is off"); // This function prints another message to the serial monitor delay(1000); // This function pauses the program for another 1000 milliseconds


Working with input and output devices




One of the most exciting aspects of Arduino programming is that you can connect various input and output devices to your board and make them interact with each other. Input devices are those that send data to your board, such as buttons, potentiometers, sensors, etc. Output devices are those that receive data from your board, such as LEDs, displays, speakers, motors, etc. To connect these devices to your board, you need to use pins, which are the small metal connectors on the edges of your board. There are two types of pins: digital and analog. Digital pins can only read or write two values: HIGH or LOW, which correspond to 5V or 0V. Analog pins can read or write a range of values between 0 and 1023, which correspond to 0V and 5V.


Some examples of how to use input and output devices with Arduino are:


connect a resistor between the LED and ground to limit the current. In your code, you need to read the state of the button using digitalRead and write the state of the LED using digitalWrite.


  • To control a servo motor with a potentiometer, you need to connect one pin of the potentiometer to 5V, another pin to ground, and the middle pin to an analog pin. You also need to connect the power and ground wires of the servo motor to 5V and ground, and the signal wire to a digital pin. In your code, you need to include the Servo library and create a Servo object. Then you need to read the value of the potentiometer using analogRead and map it to a range of angles using map. Then you need to write the angle to the servo motor using write.



  • To display temperature and humidity data on an LCD screen, you need to connect a DHT11 sensor to a digital pin and a 10k resistor between its data and power pins. You also need to connect an LCD screen to six digital pins and two potentiometers for contrast and backlight adjustment. In your code, you need to include the DHT and LiquidCrystal libraries and create DHT and LiquidCrystal objects. Then you need to read the temperature and humidity values from the sensor using readTemperature and readHumidity. Then you need to print them on the LCD screen using print.



Using libraries and shields




One of the advantages of Arduino is that it has a large collection of libraries and shields that can help you add more functionality and features to your board. Libraries are pieces of code that provide predefined functions and variables for specific tasks or devices. For example, the Servo library allows you to control servo motors, the Ethernet library allows you to communicate over Ethernet, the Wire library allows you to use I2C protocol, etc. You can use libraries by including them in your code using #include statements. You can also create your own libraries or download libraries from other sources.


Shields are hardware modules that plug into your board and provide additional components or interfaces. For example, the Ethernet shield allows you to connect your board to a network, the Wi-Fi shield allows you to connect your board to a wireless network, the Motor shield allows you to drive multiple motors, etc. You can use shields by stacking them on top of your board and connecting them with pins. You can also create your own shields or buy shields from other vendors.


Advanced Arduino programming topics




Once you master the basics of Arduino programming, you can explore some advanced topics that can enhance your skills and projects. Some of these topics are:


  • Pointers: These are variables that store the memory address of another variable or function. You can use pointers to access or modify data indirectly, pass data by reference, create dynamic arrays, etc. You can declare a pointer by using an asterisk (*) before its name, such as int *p. You can assign a pointer by using an ampersand (&) before another variable's name, such as p = &x. You can access or modify the value pointed by a pointer by using an asterisk (*) before its name, such as *p = 10.



  • Memory management: This is the process of allocating and freeing memory for your data and variables. Arduino has two types of memory: SRAM (Static Random Access Memory) and EEPROM (Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory). SRAM is used for storing global and local variables during runtime. EEPROM is used for storing permanent data that persists even after power off. You can use functions such as malloc, free, sizeof, EEPROM.write and EEPROM.read to manage memory in your code.



  • Interrupts: These are signals that trigger your board to stop its current task and execute a specific function called an interrupt service routine (ISR). Interrupts can be generated by external events such as buttons or sensors, or internal events such as timers or serial communication. You can use interrupts to handle time-sensitive tasks or events without polling or delaying your main loop. You can attach an interrupt to a digital pin using attachInterrupt and detach it using detachInterrupt. You can also define an ISR using ISR.



  • SPI and I2C protocols: These are communication protocols that allow your board to exchange data with other devices such as sensors, displays, memory cards, etc. SPI (Serial Peripheral Interface) is a synchronous protocol that uses four wires: MOSI (Master Out Slave In), MISO (Master In Slave Out), SCK (Serial Clock), and SS (Slave Select). I2C (Inter-Integrated Circuit) is an asynchronous protocol that uses two wires: SDA (Serial Data) and SCL (Serial Clock). You can use SPI and I2C protocols by including the SPI and Wire libraries and using functions such as SPI.begin, SPI.transfer, Wire.begin, Wire.write, Wire.read, etc.



Networking with Arduino




Another exciting aspect of Arduino programming is that you can connect your board to the Internet and other devices using networking shields and modules. Networking allows you to send and receive data, control your board remotely, access web services, create IoT (Internet of Things) applications, etc. Some examples of networking shields and modules are:


  • Ethernet shield: This shield allows you to connect your board to a wired network using an RJ45 connector. You can use the Ethernet library to communicate over TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) and UDP (User Datagram Protocol) protocols. You can also use the EthernetClient, EthernetServer, and EthernetUDP classes to create clients, servers, and datagram sockets.



  • Wi-Fi shield: This shield allows you to connect your board to a wireless network using an antenna. You can use the WiFi library to communicate over TCP/IP and UDP protocols. You can also use the WiFiClient, WiFiServer, and WiFiUDP classes to create clients, servers, and datagram sockets.



  • Bluetooth module: This module allows you to connect your board to other Bluetooth-enabled devices such as smartphones, tablets, computers, etc. You can use the SoftwareSerial library to communicate over serial communication. You can also use the BluetoothSerial class to create a serial port object.



Prototyping with Arduino




Prototyping is the process of creating a physical model or prototype of your device or project. Prototyping allows you to test your design, functionality, usability, and feasibility before creating a final product. Prototyping with Arduino can be fun and easy with the help of some tools and techniques such as:


  • Breadboard: This is a plastic board with holes that are connected by metal strips. You can use a breadboard to create temporary circuits without soldering by inserting wires and components into the holes.



  • Jumpers: These are wires with metal pins or clips at both ends. You can use jumpers to connect components on a breadboard or between boards.



  • Resistors: These are components that limit the flow of current in a circuit. You can use resistors to protect your components from damage or to create voltage dividers.



  • Capacitors: These are components that store and release electric charge in a circuit. You can use capacitors to smooth out voltage fluctuations or to create timers.



  • Soldering: This is the process of joining metal parts by melting a metal alloy called solder. You can use soldering to create permanent circuits on a PCB (Printed Circuit Board) or to attach wires and components.



Arduino projects




Now that you have learned the basics of Arduino programming, you might be wondering what kind of projects you can create or modify using the book Arduino Programming in 24 Hours, Sams Teach Yourself. The book provides 12 projects that cover different topics and skills such as:


  • Project 1: Blinking an LED: This project teaches you how to control an LED using digital output.



  • Project 2: Reading a Button: This project teaches you how to read a button using digital input.



  • Project 3: Controlling an RGB LED: This project teaches you how to control an RGB LED using analog output.



  • Project 4: Reading a Potentiometer: This project teaches you how to read a potentiometer using analog input.



  • Project 5: Controlling a Servo Motor: This project teaches you how to control a servo motor using the Servo library.



  • Project 6: Reading a Temperature Sensor: This project teaches you how to read a temperature sensor using the DHT library.



  • Project 7: Displaying Data on an LCD Screen: This project teaches you how to display data on an LCD screen using the LiquidCrystal library.



  • Project 8: Sending Data over Serial Communication: This project teaches you how to send data over serial communication using the Serial library.



  • Project 9: Receiving Data over Serial Communication: This project teaches you how to receive data over serial communication using the Serial library.



Ethernet library.


  • Project 11: Receiving Data over Ethernet Communication: This project teaches you how to receive data over Ethernet communication using the Ethernet library.



  • Project 12: Creating a Web Server: This project teaches you how to create a web server using the Ethernet library and HTML.



These projects are just examples of what you can do with Arduino. You can modify them to suit your needs or preferences, or you can create your own projects from scratch. The possibilities are endless!


Conclusion




In this article, we have given you an overview of what Arduino Programming in 24 Hours, Sams Teach Yourself by Richard Blum can offer you. This book is a comprehensive and practical guide that can teach you C programming on Arduino in 24 easy-to-follow lessons. You can learn everything from setting up your programming environment to creating advanced projects using networking and prototyping tools. You can also access the code and resources for the book online at http://www.informit.com/title/9780672337123.


If you are interested in learning Arduino programming or improving your skills, we highly recommend you to get this book and follow along with the lessons and projects. You will be amazed by what you can create with Arduino and how much fun you can have along the way. Arduino programming is not only a useful skill, but also a rewarding hobby that can enrich your life and inspire others.


So what are you waiting for? Grab your Arduino board, download the Arduino IDE, get the book, and start programming!


FAQs




  • Q: Where can I buy the book?



  • A: You can buy the book online from various retailers such as Amazon, Barnes & Noble, InformIT, etc. You can also find it in some local bookstores or libraries.



  • Q: What kind of Arduino board do I need for the book?



  • A: The book uses an Arduino Uno board for most of the examples and projects. However, you can also use other compatible boards such as Arduino Nano, Arduino Mega, etc.



  • Q: What kind of components and tools do I need for the book?



  • A: The book provides a list of components and tools that you need for each lesson and project. Some of the common components and tools are LEDs, buttons, potentiometers, sensors, motors, LCD screen, Ethernet shield, Wi-Fi shield, Bluetooth module, breadboard, jumpers, resistors, capacitors, soldering iron, etc.



  • Q: How can I get help or support for the book?



  • A: You can get help or support for the book by visiting the book's website at http://www.informit.com/title/9780672337123. There you can find the code and resources for the book, errata and updates, feedback form, author's bio and contact information, etc.



  • Q: How can I share my projects or feedback with the author or other readers?



  • A: You can share your projects or feedback with the author or other readers by using social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, etc. You can also use online forums such as Arduino Forum, Stack Overflow, Reddit, etc. Don't forget to use hashtags such as #ArduinoProgrammingIn24Hours or #SamsTeachYourselfArduinoProgramming to reach a wider audience.



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